How to cure swollen feet

Swollen legs is quite an unpleasant condition that can disrupt your daily life.

Leg swelling caused by the retention of fluid in leg tissues is known as peripheral edema. It can be caused by a problem with the circulatory system, the lymphatic system or the kidneys. You may also experience swelling due to fluid buildup after sitting or standing for a long time.
Factors related to fluid buildup include:

  1. Acute kidney failure
  2. Cardiomyopathy (disease of heart tissue)
  3. Chronic kidney disease
  4. Cirrhosis (scarring of the liver)
  5. Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)
  6. Heart failure
  7. Hormone therapy
  8. Lymphedema (blockage in the lymph system)
  9. Nephrotic syndrome (damage to small filtering blood vessels in the kidneys)
  10. Pain relievers, such as ibuprofen or naproxen
  11. Pericarditis (swelling of the membrane surrounding the heart)
  12. Pregnancy
  13. Prescription medications, including some used for diabetes and high blood pressure
  14. Sitting for a long time, such as during airline flights
  15. Standing for a long time
  16. Thrombophlebitis (a blood clot that usually occurs in the leg)
  17. Venous insufficiency, chronic (leg veins with a problem returning blood to the heart)

Leg swelling related to inflammation

Leg swelling can also be caused by inflammation in leg tissues. Inflammation may be a normal response to injury or disease, or it may be due to rheumatoid arthritis or another inflammatory disorder. You will usually feel some pain with inflammation.

Factors that can contribute to inflammation in the leg include:

  1. Achilles tendon rupture
  2. ACL injury (tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament in your knee)
  3. Baker’s cyst
  4. Broken ankle/broken foot
  5. Broken leg
  6. Cellulitis (a skin infection)
  7. Gout (arthritis related to excess uric acid)
  8. Infection or wound in the leg
  9. Knee bursitis (inflammation of fluid-filled sacs in the knee joint)
  10. Osteoarthritis (disease causing the breakdown of joints)
  11. Rheumatoid arthritis (inflammatory joint disease)
  12. Sprained ankle

Remedy for Swollen Legs

powerful-home-made-tea-will-cure-swollen-legs-days

Swollen legs are quite painful and uncomfortable. To reduce the swelling, lie down and raise your legs up to a height of about 30 cm.

This is a quick, mild, and temporary solution to this problem, but in this post, you will read about a natural way how to completely eliminate the excess fluids from the body, and thus reduce the swelling in the legs. The solution to swollen legs is parsley tea. This natural diuretic provides many benefits on the overall health and well-being.

Parsley Benefits

The delicious and vibrant taste and wonderful healing properties of parsley are often ignored in its popular role as a table garnish. Highly nutritious, parsley can be found year round in your local supermarket.

Parsley is the world’s most popular herb. It derives its name from the Greek word meaning “rock celery” (parsley is a relative to celery). It is a biennial plant that will return to the garden year after year once it is established.

A sprig of parsley can provide much more than a decoration on your plate. Parsley contains two types of unusual components that provide unique health benefits. The first type is volatile oil components—including myristicin, limonene, eugenol, and alpha-thujene. The second type is flavonoids—including apiin, apigenin, crisoeriol, and luteolin.

A Rich Source of Anti-Oxidant Nutrients

The flavonoids in parsley—especially luteolin—have been shown to function as antioxidants that combine with highly reactive oxygen-containing molecules (called oxygen radicals) and help prevent oxygen-based damage to cells. In addition, extracts from parsley have been used in animal studies to help increase the antioxidant capacity of the blood.

In addition to its volatile oils and flavonoids, parsley is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin A (notably through its concentration of the pro-vitamin A carotenoid, beta-carotene).

Vitamin C has many different functions. It is the body’s primary water-soluble antioxidant, rendering harmless otherwise dangerous free radicals in all water-soluble areas of the body. High levels of free radicals contribute to the development and progression of a wide variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, colon cancer, diabetes, and asthma. This may explain why people who consume healthy amounts of vitamin C-containing foods have reduced risks for all these conditions. Vitamin C is also a powerful anti-inflammatory agent, which explains its usefulness in conditions such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. And since vitamin C is needed for the healthy function of the immune system, it can also be helpful for preventing recurrent ear infections or colds.

Beta-carotene, another important antioxidant, works in the fat-soluble areas of the body. Diets with beta-carotene-rich foods are also associated with a reduced risk for the development and progression of conditions like atherosclerosis, diabetes, and colon cancer. Like vitamin C, beta-carotene may also be helpful in reducing the severity of asthma, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis. And beta-carotene is converted by the body to vitamin A, a nutrient so important to a strong immune system that its nickname is the “anti-infective vitamin.”

Parsley for a Healthy Heart

Parsley is a good source of folic acid, one of the most important B vitamins. While it plays numerous roles in the body, one of its most critical roles in relation to cardiovascular health is its necessary participation in the process through which the body converts homocysteine into benign molecules. Homocysteine is a potentially dangerous molecule that, at high levels, can directly damage blood vessels, and high levels of homocysteine are associated with a significantly increased risk of heart attack and stroke in people with atherosclerosis or diabetic heart disease. Enjoying foods rich in folic acid, like parsley, is an especially good idea for individuals who either have, or wish to prevent, these diseases. Folic acid is also a critical nutrient for proper cell division and is therefore vitally important for cancer-prevention in two areas of the body that contain rapidly dividing cells—the colon, and in women, the cervix.

Protection against Rheumatoid Arthritis

While one study suggests that high doses of supplemental vitamin C makes osteoarthritis, a type of degenerative arthritis that occurs with aging, worse in laboratory animals, another indicates that vitamin C-rich foods, such as parsley, provide humans with protection against inflammatory polyarthritis, a form of rheumatoid arthritis involving two or more joints.

The findings, presented in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases were drawn from a study of more than 20,000 subjects who kept diet diaries and were arthritis-free when the study began, and focused on subjects who developed inflammatory polyarthritis and similar subjects who remained arthritis-free during the follow-up period. Subjects who consumed the lowest amounts of vitamin C-rich foods were more than three times more likely to develop arthritis than those who consumed the highest amounts.

So, next time parsley appears on your plate as a garnish, recognize its true worth and partake of its abilities to improve your health. As an added bonus, you’ll also enjoy parsley’s legendary ability to cleanse your palate and your breath at the end of your meal.

How to Prepare Parsley Tea

In 500 ml of boiled water, add five tablespoons of freshly and finely chopped parsley leaves and roots. Boil for another five minutes. Then, let the tea cool for about 20 minutes, and strain.

How to Use

Consume the tea 3 times a day, and the swellings of your legs should disappear in a few days.