Why Your Grandparents Didn’t Have Food Allergies— But You Do

Did it ever cross your mind as to why your grandparents did not have food allergies … or that it wasn’t as common as it is with our children today?

Food allergies are becoming a household concern and are on the rise. In addition to making life difficult for those who suffer from this modern epidemic, this is also further taxing to our medical system and our pockets.

 

“Every 3 minutes, a food allergy reaction sends someone to the emergency department – that is more than 200,000 emergency department visits per year.”

FoodAllergy

Grandparents Allergies

According to a study released in 2013 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, food allergies among children increased approximately 50% between 1997 and 2011.

This is where it all started, with our babies …

Dr. Mercola, points out that allergies to milk are the number one food allergy in the US, and he attributes this to the usage of growth hormones in milk, as well as the overuse of antibiotics in factory farming, which began in the 1990’s:

Is There Something “Foreign” in Our Food Today that Wasn’t There Before?
Absolutely!

Processed foods in general can contribute to allergies for a number of different reasons. Most processed foods contain a variety of food colorings, flavors, preservatives, and other additives can have a major impact. But there’s another, even more insidious hazard lurking in American food stores…

In the mid-1990′s, new food proteins were engineered and introduced into our food supply, yet many people are still, to this day, clueless about this. As O’Brien states, it was clearly done to maximize profitability for the food industry, yet NO human trials were ever conducted to see if these genetically engineered proteins were actually safe for animal- and human consumption.

One of the first foods to undergo this change was milk, which incidentally is also the number one food allergen in the US.

In 1994, the dairy industry started using a genetically engineered growth hormone, rBGH (recombinant bovine growth hormone) on cows in order to increase milk production. However, it resulted in higher rates of disease in the treated livestock. To counteract the ill effects, dairies also had to start using more antibiotics, which we now know is one of the driving factors behind the rise in antibiotic-resistant superbugs in humans.

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